My recent post about fiction book bags as Christmas presents proved very popular so here another one about creating non-fiction book bags for blokes. (Book bags for ladies coming tomorrow.)

First up, how to sew a fabric bag for a book. There are very clear instructions here on the Design Dazzle website.

I did some research and found out what some of the most popular hobbies for men are. Here are book bag ideas based on those.


1. Gardening

First up, a couple of ebook suggestions:

The Garden Seed Saving Guide. To go with this – pair of gardening gloves, small trowel, small flower pots, sticky labels.

Preparing a Garden from the Ground Up. All of the above gift suggestions apply as well as packs of seeds.


2. Golf

I don’t know a thing about golf apart from that it’s very popular, so I won’t offer advice on which ebooks to buy. There are zillions of ebooks on the subject to choose from. However, some golf balls, socks, tees or a pair of golfing gloves would fill up a book bag for a golfer very nicely.


3. Fishing

Again, there are lots of books out there to choose from, but this looks interesting – Fishing – Learn from the Tips and Laugh at the Tales. Into the book bag go some hooks, flies, line, disgorger, lures, small bags of boilies etc – the list of little fishy gifts is endless.


4. Flying

Pilots might enjoy Thunder in the Tummy, a collection of funny true tales by a pilot.

Youngsters thinking of learning to fly will benefit from this book, Teenage Pilot.

Suggested book bag goodies might be a chart, sunglasses, flying gloves, pilot’s watch, model aeroplane, tie with planes on etc.


5. Homebrewing and Winemaking

A promising looking ebook for all homebrewers is Beer and Ingredients here.

And for 99 cents you could add a work of fiction on the subject in the shape of Secret Life of the Brewer’s Yeast: A Microbiology Tale.

I came across one for winemaking which was 582 words long and cost $6.99 so for obvious reasons I won’t be recommending that one. Not the sort of ebook you want to see out there.

Again, there are plenty of little things you can put in a book bag – stoppers, brewer’s yeast, straining bags, funnels, tube brushes, litmus paper, labels …


6. Shooting

Here’s a good ebook: Why You Can’t Shoot Straight

Gifts for the book bag would be small targets, old CDs to shoot at, earplugs, safety glasses.


7. Geocaching

Exploring With GPS: A Practical Field Guide for Satellite Navigation

And a novel to go with it: Twin Falls

You could pop an old-fashioned compass into the bookbag, but most useful for the geocaching man in your life would be a selection of small items he can put in the caches he finds. What happens in geocaching is that you take a small item from the cache you find after signing the log, and leave something in its place. You could also put in a plastic container with a very tight seal in case the geocacher wants to create his own one somewhere.


Hope these ideas help.

I think chapters should always have titles. It tends to be essential in non-fiction books, and in my opinion it’s as important in fiction.  And even more so with the advent of the Kindle. There is nothing more dull than having two full screens or so at the start of the book merely listing Chapter 1, Chapter 2 etc. OK, these are hyperlinked to the relevant chapter, although I can’t actually see why you’d use that facility much, since Kindle remembers where you got up to, and opens the book on that page next time you call it up. You don’t have to go back to the chapter list to find where you were. And anyway, only a very organised person would remember the number of the chapter. You’d be far more likely to remember its name – our brains are built that way.

So why are so many authors reluctant to give a short name to each chapter? One word will do to act as a reflection of its content? A taster of what’s to come? Either would be far more appealing than Chapter X. Thrillers and mysteries often use time and dates to break up the text. That’s good too. Children’s fiction generally uses chapter names, so we’re all used to it. I can’t see any justification for dropping the practice when we progress to YA and adult works. There’s no logic to it.

I’ve had fun naming the chapters in my two forthcoming big projects, Something Fishy, a racy fishing mystery (fiction) and my non-fiction travel narrative Heads Above Water. For the latter I’ve incorporated a relevant French quotation too at the opening of each chapter, one that ties in with the heading. It didn’t take long and I think it adds a further level of enjoyment for the reader. For my fiction work, I’ve simply used a punchy gerund that best reflects the action of the chapter e.g. Meeting, Catching, Drowning. It wasn’t too demanding!

So, bring back chapter headings I say. Readers appreciate them. They’re memorable, entertaining and a lot more interesting than just a number.

I signed up with Xinxii today. OK , so what’s Xinxii? Xinxii is a digital self-publishing platform which launched in Germany in 2008, and began operating in English last year. It allows you to sell your documents in up to 15 different formats.

Xinxii evolved from CEO Dr Andrea Shober’s publishing company, which focussed on guides for expats and business people working abroad. She decided to launch a platform where authors could upload and sell their works in this area, and it took off from there. Authors keep full control of editing and copyright, and sell their works through their own Xinxii e-store. Constantly developing, Xinxii will be able to support ereaders and mobile platforms in the very near future.

Xinxii runs in four language versions – English, French, German and Spanish. But customers can come from anywhere – they can pay in dollars, euros or sterling. It’s free to upload your books to the site. You, the author, sets the price (minimum 99 US cents) and get paid for every purchase. You keep 40% of the net sales for documents priced between between 99 cents and 2.48 dollars, and 70% for books priced 2.40 and above.

I’ve got Oh Auntie! up on Xinxii and will be very interested to see how it goes. The site offers lots of advice on publicity using social media and so on, which I shall take plenty of time to study.

Check Xinxii out at You’ll find Oh Auntie here.

After dithering for a week or so over whether to invest in a much-trumpeted ‘write a book in 28 days’ course, I finally gave in and decided to give it a shot. My CD for the Nick Daws course came yesterday so I installed it at once and had a look.

First glance, I wasn’t that impressed. There didn’t seem to be a great deal of material there. However, sitting outside the judo dojo in Boussac while Caiti tussled with and threw blokes around for an hour, I had a much more thoughtful look through. And … frankly, I’m a convert. I’ve already drafted out two non-fiction books I intend to write, inspired by the ideas of how to go about it on the CD. I’ve seen how to improve on Heads Above Water, my living in France book, big time, and maybe now even get two or three books out of the idea. And there’s advice on fiction too which I shall study this afternoon while the Saturday judo class takes place, once I’ve done a quick shop at Simply Market of course. Now that the two teens are home for the hols, apart from a couple of days of exams back a lycée, food shopping becomes a regular and very tedious pastime, the downside to having them at home all the time. But a price worth paying!

So, I’m very enthused with writing ideas at the moment. So enthused I hardly slept a wink last night due to buzzy brain syndrome. The CD should come with a health warning. I’m going to introduce my office hours for the hols ie times when I will sit and write and mustn’t be disturbed (by others) or distracted (by the Internet,and darned if I can’t produce my book in 4 weeks! Watch this space …