The Promise of Tomorrow

Charlotte Brookes flees her lecherous guardian, McBride, taking her younger sister with her. After a year on the road, they stumble into a Yorkshire village. There, they are taken in by the Wheelers, owners of the village shop. This new life is strange for Charlotte, but preferable to living with McBride or surviving on the roads.
Harry Belmont is an important man in the village, but he’s missing something in his life. His budding friendship with Charlotte gives him hope she will feel more for him one day, and he will have the woman he needs.
However, when McBride finds out where Charlotte lives, his threats begin, and Harry takes it upon himself to keep Charlotte safe. Only, World War I erupts and Harry enlists.
Left to face a world of new responsibilities, and Harry’s difficult sister, Charlotte must run the gauntlet of family disputes, McBride’s constant harassment and the possibility of the man she loves being killed.

Can Charlotte find the happiness that always seems under threat, and will Harry return home to her?

 

My review

The Promise of Tomorrow is a touching and powerful historical romance set just prior to and during the First World War. It grabs the reader’s attention from the very start when we meet the conniving McBride, who is planning to ‘lose’ his ghastly wife and marry his wealthy ward instead.

Those plans evidently go wrong because in the next chapter we meet Charlotte and her little sister, Hannah, who are living on the streets. Charlotte realised in time that something bad was going on and chose to life rough with her sister, supporting them both by working then stay where she was, in a life of luxury but menace. Charlotte is our heroine, and we see straight away that she’s a remarkable and strong woman. This strength remains throughout the novel as further challenges come her way.

So does romance. Harry is the perfect foil for her. He too is strong and loyal, and these two good souls are well suited. But he enlists, putting his own life in danger with all the other brave young soldiers, but also Charlotte’s since McBride is hot on her trail. Tension builds as the book progresses with these added dangers to Charlotte’s happiness. She has a lot to deal with, but her love for Harry and her family keep her motivated.

The story is moving at times, terrifying at others. Our characters ran the gamut of emotions from despair to elation, and are all interesting to meet. The plot is clever and the writing absorbing. All in all this is a polished and pleasing work of historical fiction.

Purchase Links:

Amazon UKhttps://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07GHCXQ8Y/

Amazon US – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GHCXQ8Y/

 

Author bio

Australian-born AnneMarie Brear writes historical novels and modern romances and sometimes the odd short story, too. Her passions, apart from writing, are travelling, reading, researching historical eras and looking for inspiration for her next book.

Social Media Links

http://www.annemariebrear.com
http://annemariebrear.blogspot.co.uk
https://www.facebook.com/annemariebrear
Twitter @annemariebrear

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