splinteredThe Splintered Circle is a thoughtful and original mystery. An elderly man, Max, has hired Raif Condor to retrieve items for him and deliver them. The items are heavy and turn out to be fragments – splinters – of stone. If Max, via Raif, can gather all the pieces then he can solve a puzzle and discover the whereabouts of something very valuable.  However, the final splinter eludes him and there are some other issues he needs to deal with as well.

We also have Fleur Fern, who is sent by a private detective trying to discover what happened to a man who has disappeared. Her investigations take her to Guernsey where, handily, she’s able to stay in her aunt’s cottage while she works.

Raif has to travel quite far and wide in his work for Max, and suddenly realises he could be at risk. He’s sure he’s being watched. Fleur makes some unexpected discoveries of a personal nature which bring her and Rair into contact. The German occupation of the Channel Islands during the Second World War emerges to have a crucial role to play in the unfolding mystery of the stone splinters.

The Splintered Circle is very much a book about places. The author has an incredibly sharp eye for detail and creates the various locations that are depicted in this novel with great authenticity and atmosphere.  Characters too are well portrayed. They’re interesting, complex, realistic people, but each one with an attractive amount of mysteriousness about them that adds to the general air of mystery in the book.

It’s well written, very carefully structured novel and the changing focus from Raif’s activities to Fleur’s investigations keeps the reader interested and on their toes. There’s tension, intrigue and touches of humour. The plot moves at a good pace and it’s original and certainly not predictable. There’s more to solve than the problem of stones and readers are kept guessing to the very end.

Ruby Stone has produced an impressive and enjoyable novel with the added interest of the modern historical elements within it. Her book is well presented in terms of editing and formatting, and has an attractive, well designed and exectuted cover that hints at the contents and inspires interest.

I look forward to reading more by this author.

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