I’ve saved a lot of paper since I got my Kindle. Not just in physical books that I haven’t bought, but in all the pages of MSs I haven’t printed out to proofread. I find it hard to proofread totally accurately off a computer screen. More errors tend to slip through. This is mainly because you’re so familiar with your own writing that your brain cuts in and says ‘yeah, yeah, that bit’s OK’, and stops you seeing any typos.

Previous the solution was to print the piece of writing out. This isn’t always mega practical. My first draft of Something Fishy was 180,000 words (that’s now become two books of a slightly more realistic size!) and that was a heck of a lot of paper. Even using draft print quality, it must have used a fair bit of ink. And draft is kind of hard to read so that was a false economy.

But now, instead of printing out pages and pages of MSs, I use my Kindle to proofread them. How? First I convert the work into .prc format using Mobipocket creator. This program is a free download, and it’s fantastic. Once I’ve got that file, then I email it my Kindle using my personal @free.kindle.com address. Alternatively, I could transfer it via cable. I could also read the .prc file on Kindle Previewer, another free piece of software that simulates how a book will appear when Kindle-ised.

Using Kindle to proofread gives your piece of writing a new appearance so that you’re focusing sharply on it and will pick up those annoying little mistakes that try and hide. And there is the added bonus that you can do your proofreading on the move (on the bus, at the hairdressers, waiting for the kids) and flag any typos or areas where you need to do some reworking by adding a note. Or, when you’re at home, do what I do and have Kindle next to computer and make the adjustments as you go.

I’m not alone in using my Kindle this way. Prolific and well known author Markee Anderson does the same thing.

The Kindle is already green and this extra use of it is making it even  more so. A report by Cleantech Group on the carbon footprint of the Kindle stated: “…the second-generation Kindle represents the same emissions as 15 books bought in person or 30 purchased online. That would yield a range of between 60.2 to 306 kg of CO2, or an average of 167.78 kg of CO2 during its lifespan.”  Now, other green groups have challenged this and estimate that the figures are more likely to be actually twice that i.e. around 30 physical books and 60 ebooks. (See here, for example.) However, that still makes me a lot greener. I’m getting through several books a week on my Kindle. I imagine most Kindle users are fairly heavy book consumers and so generally there’s an overall benefit to the planet in using ereaders.

3 thoughts on “Using the Kindle To Proofread – And To Be Green

  1. I completely agree! Reading on a Kindle is SO much different than reading on paper or on a computer screen. I’ve found the pacing on a Kindle is faster, and paragraphs have to be shorter, so they don’t span more than one Kindle page. I figure, my readers enjoy my books on the Kindle, so why not read what they’re reading? It certainly makes a huge difference!

    Thank you, Stephanie!! 🙂

  2. Thank you for that information. I’d not considered it before, but it makes sense. It’s how I read all my books now, so, as Markee said, why not read what they’re reading?

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